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Ricky Gervais, an English comedian and actor, once said, "Dear intelligent people of the world, don't get shampoo in your eyes. It really stings. There. Done. Now f***ing stop torturing animals." (Gervais). Although people may receive Mr. Gervais' words as harsh, his message contains truth, that people need to stop testing on animals. Animals need to stop being the center of laboratory and farm experiments, or at least given more rights to protect their general welfare and life. Scientists started using animals in testing in 1851 as a part of learning in the classroom at universities (ProQuest). Animals started to be used because doing the experiments on humans would be viewed as unethical and inhumane, but should not the treatment of animals be seen as unethical and inhumane too? The experiments that use animals to test everything from cosmetics to scientific advancements often offer no help to the companies. Animals used to test the effect of certain ingredients do not have the same biology as humans, so the testing often harms or kills thousands of animals and humans a year because of faulty testing (Greek "Animal Experimentation is Unscientific" 87). The same goes for the animals used to test the effect of different ingredients in our food and whether or not it causes cancer or other health conditions. This food comes from a factory farm, Dictionary.com defines it as "a farm in which animals are bred and fattened using modern industrial methods" ("Factory Farms"). Factory Farms produce many bad products, including the meat that comes from them. Factory farms produce the meat that a person would see when they walk into a grocery store. Many animal rights activists believe that the modern activist movement started in 1975 with the writing of Animal Liberation (ProQuest). From what humans put on their skin to what they put in their stomachs, animals have an impact on their everyday lives and in most cases, humans mistreat these animals. Therefore, animals deserve rights to protect their lives and sanity. Animals should be given more legal rights and protection to prevent harm caused by any animal experimentations and factory farms. The question taking charge of this movement: do animals deserve rights, if so how much? Humans first began to find interest in the way the animal body worked in 1625, when William Harvey published a book on the animal body and thus started animal experimentation (ProQuest). From then on it escalated it into the fiasco that it has become today.This then lead to the need of anti-animal cruelty laws, which in 1822, Great Britain passed the first law that banned harm against farm animals called Martin's Act (ProQuest). From the on american lawmakers passed the Animal Welfare Act, in 1966, which affects the sale, research, and showing of animals, except for mice, rats, birds, and animals on farms (ProQuest). From the on americans took the movement. For example, the U.S. Humane Act, which prevents the cruel killing of awake cattle and hogs, does not protect chickens, so they die a painful death while still in a conscious state(Clemmitt 4). If this or anything noted as abuse happens Suffolk County in New York, has a registry for animal abusers much like the ones for sex offenders (ProQuest). Many of the experiments that take place use chimps; but in 2013, the U.S. restricted testing on chimps and put the rest in retirement (ProQuest). In the past, chimps and many other animals have not been as fortunate as the chimps under this law. They did not have the same legal protection and scientists did not treat them fairly or humanely, so they would be tortured in their experiments. Animals have been able to achieve more legal protection in the last 15 years because only 10 U.S. colleges used to have animal-law majors 15 years ago, but now 130+ have this major available (Clemmitt 1). Scientists, in the past, subjected chimps to inhumane and insane experiments, not caring for their welfare. Especially in the 5 worst states for animal protection laws: Kentucky, Mississippi, Hawaii, Idaho, and North Dakota (Clemmitt 4). Some of the protection laws do not protect the farm animals on factory farms. This inhumane treatment leads to much more bad effects that affect the human environment. For instance, factory farms produce huge amounts of animal waste, which in turn contaminates the air with emissions and the water with the bacteria from the waste (Weeks 25). Cows alone produce more carbon dioxide emissions in a year than all the transportation methods, such as cars, trains, planes, and boats, combined (Lean). These cows also do not see the sun or breathe the outside air until right before they die or during the move to another barnhouse (Weeks 27). Animals need to have more legal protection than already given to them because this life would not be ideal for any creature, human or animal. Experimentation started a long time ago, but has gotten progressively worse as the years go on. Nevertheless some may still argue that when scientist designed animal experiments; it did not include torture. They designed them to make medical advancements. John C. Dalton experimenting on live animals as a part of classroom instruction as a harmless way to teach students (ProQuest). However, in the end many of the experiments make no medical breakthroughs and they torture and hurt the animals used in them. For example, three of the monkeys at the Institute for Biological Research in Silver Spring; Chester, Sarah, and Domitian (Pacheco 189). Chester led the pack of monkeys, but he felt that he could not protect them against the harm of the experiments and this made him angry at the world (Pacheco 189). Sarah would attack her foot and spin around and around, all the while crying like a baby (Pacheco 189). Domitian would attack his arm as if he did not feel it and would masturbate all the time (Pacheco 189). The experiments caused mental problems which led to the strange behavior. These same hungry monkeys, along with others, picked at their food scraps in an attempt to curb their hunger (Pacheco 188-189). These behaviors and conditions combined led to the insanity of many of the monkeys in the experiments. Conditions probably added to that fact. Research labs often have less than ideal conditions, where the monkeys live and how the scientists treat them. 70.6% of the monkeys in the research had "disabled limbs" from the surgery in their younger years (Pacheco 189). Scientists performed these surgeries to find out what would happen if they broke or disabled a bone and how the monkeys would keep living their lives. In two of the cases, the monkeys actually had bones poking out of their skin, but "no one [had] bothered to bandage the monkeys injuries properly..., and antibiotics were administered only once; no lacerations were ever cleaned" (Pacheco 190). Which means that the medical care that humans expect, the monkeys did not receive. Once the humans finished with the experimentations with the monkeys in the laboratories, the monkeys went back to cages filled with filth, feces, urine, and rust (Pacheco 188). So they never got to see the bright, shiny side of life because the scientists running the experiments did not make sure that the monkeys would have a healthy, happy environment like the humans they do the experiments for do. These conditions that the monkeys lived in probably changed the results of the experiments. Scientists that use the Draize test try to prevent changes in the experimentation through many different methods. Because the rabbits in this experiment try to claw out the liquid or foreign objects from the eye, the researchers try to prevent this by putting the rabbits in restraints that only show their faces (Singer 175). But the rabbits then try to blink it out, so researchers hold open the rabbits eyes with metal clips (Singer 175). The scientists try to prevent an instinct, both human and animal, humans try to remove the object by blinking or rubbing their eye. Rabbits "squeal, claw, jump, and try to escape", which means that they show signs of distress and uncomfort during the experiments mentioned before (Singer 175). The rabbits exhibit these signs as of showing inhumanity and cruelty the experiments. Some companies that used this testing method, Revlon and Avon, Revlon specifically said that in 1977 they used about 2,000 rabbits in testing that year (Singer 176). That means that 2,000 rabbits had to go through that torture that year in only one company. Do humans need another beauty product or another aspirin in the name of hurting an animal (Singer 176)? These corporations try to sell a fantasy world of cures and beauty to their buyers, while creating a horrible world for the animals who help make those products (Singer 176), so they deserve more rights to protect their sanity and general health. The animals put through these horrible experiments do not deserve that kind of life, they deserve a life of love and happiness in the wild or domestic homes. While not in a laboratory, animals still experience torture elsewhere; for example a factory farm. Although many factory farms do not abuse their animals, the few that do exist do make national news and reflect badly on the other farms. However, only certain videos, pictures, and articles that companies release can show which farms abuse their animals and which ones do not. Farmers, even though they do not make national or local news, still abuse animals. Like the cattle in one video "were shown knock[ed] to the ground and strap[ped] down - fully conscious, in panic, eyes bulging" while awaiting slaughter (Park 122). The cows do not need to be torture before they die because like any human being they want to die a peaceful life and have a peaceful death. Farmers start the torture for cattle at a very young age with a procedure called 'dehorning' (Byer). Farmers do this procedure without giving the calf anything to take away the pain, making it a more traumatic experience for the calf (Byer). When a cow gets dehorned it "struggle[s] desperately, thrash[es], toss[es] their heads, rear[s] up, bellowing, and collasp[es] to the ground - all signs of severe pain and distress" (Byer). A cow shows the pain of the dehorning through its actions when the cow gets its horns removed. The cow being dehorned counts as a traumatic event in their life and can affect the rest of their life. Just like a traumatic event can affect a person for the rest of their life, a farmer removing the horns of a calf when it has only been living for a few days can cause distress and pain to the calf for the rest of its life (Byer). Another way in which farmers traumatize and hurt baby animals called thumping. The farmers use this technique to kill the underweight piglets, they hold the piglets by their back legs and throwing their heads into the concrete ground (Genoways 40). Yet Ted Genoways describes thumping as "legal and widely practiced" (40). More times than not, thumping does not actually kill the piglet, but instead just paralyzes it until death from starvation or suffocation. It would be more effective and a lot less detrimental if the farmers would let the piglets live, instead of using all of the resources to make that piglet just to kill it. The conditions that the animals live in these factory farms would be demeaned as awful by most humans. The standard size for a hog pen in a factory farm can be described as "two-foot-by-seven-foot' and allows the hogs of these farms to stand up and "lay down but not turn around" (Weeks 39). That means that day by day the hog sees the same thing, and by the second day that scenery would get pretty boring for both humans and animals a like. These hogs only go outside to be moved to a different barn or put into a truck for slaughter (Weeks 27). Seeing the same scenery everyday and then only seeing the sun when they get put into a truck for slaughter, factory farms provide the hogs and other animals with a tough life. Animals stuck in these factory farms live in less than ideal conditions produce a less healthy meat, so animals should receive more rights to give them better conditions to make better meat. Because the farms torture their animals, the meat that the farms produce has unhealthy qualities to it. Factory farms, which produce much of the meat served today, provide an unsafe and unhealthy environment, which in turn produces an unhealthy meat product. Factory farms, like Perdue, feed their chickens hormones, which cause them to grow fatter faster, but leaves them "debilitated, suffering from bone deformities, gait abnormalities, ruptured tendons, and metabolic diseases" (Park 122). People eat this food without knowing what the animals go through just to give them their food that they enjoy every day. Factory farms force chickens to gain much more fat and muscle faster than they would in the natural world (Park 122). This, as of today, has no known effect on the human body, but no one can tell what the effects will be in the future. Another effect of the unhealthiness of factory farms, mad cow disease. In the 1980s and 1990s mad cow disease, which can be spread by feeding ground-up infected parts of cows to other cows, caused dozens of deaths in Europe (Weeks 38). The farmers of the factory farm feed the cows parts of other cows, but ground up just because they can not buy or farm food for their cattle. This disease can also be caused by other forms of cheap protein, like poultry litter and feces (Weeks 38). Because the animals do not get the correct kind of nutrition produce a lot of animal waste, which in turn contaminates the air and water supply (Weeks 25). This side effect may contaminate a factory farm with a bacteria that farmers use antibiotics to cure, but the bacteria come back even stronger next time killing even more cattle than it would have originally (Weeks 25). Which, if a person thinks about it, giving antibiotics proves pointless because the antibiotics only make the bacteria stronger and make it more movable from species to species. Animals and humans both get sick, but humans wait until they get better, whereas farmers expect that the animals should be healthy all the time, but that would be impossible to expect from animals. According to data from the 1990s, in their lifetime Americans will eat about 23 pigs, 3 lambs, 11 cattle, 45 turkeys, and 1,097 chickens ( James 13). If humans eat all this meat, with all of these messed up conditions, only time can tell the effects on the human body. All of these pretenses will lead to ill-effects on the human body, much like experiments that use animals, so to help protect the human race animals need to be given more rights. Experiments use animals as test subjects, even though these experiments often do not have an impact on medicine. Arguably some medical advancements such as; vaccines for cholera and rabies, how malaria transmits from being to being, and coronary bypass procedures, however most modern improvements have been made without the use of animals (ProQuest). Only certain animals, like dogs or cats can legally be exempted from experimentation, noted as the "lovable" ones, but all animals can and will be loved by someone somewhere (Singer 175). But that does not matter because all animals can and do suffer in experiments, no matter how repulsive or adorable (Singer 175). Often animals do receive the basic necessities unless they 'perform' what the scientists expects. Below a picture of a monkey smoking, the caption reads that it "is forced to smoke before it is given water" (James 26). The scientists used this experiment to help figure out the causes of lung cancer and other diseases related to smoking (James 26). Now imagine a person being forced to smoke just so that they can get the water that they need for daily survival. Scientists also know that smoking has dangerous side effects on humans, so why torture and put an animal through the same pain? In addition, all the major medical advancements of this century have been made without animal experimentation; advancements such as, vaccines, MRIs, and anesthesiology (Greek "At Issue: Animal Experimentation" 25-26). These advancement take a major part in today's healthcare, and scientists created them without any harm to animals through animal experimentation. A final problem, testing also "assumes that animals and humans are similar at the cellular and molecular level", which in fact they do not possess the same genes (Greek "Animal Experimentation" 87). If humans and animals had the same DNA, then they would all be rats, humans, or monkeys, so why use something that has different DNA than humans? Using animals to see the effects of something on a human assumes that the result that the animals produce will suffice for humans, but in fact, 51.5% of the medications released in the 1970s and 1980s, had to be relabeled because of severe side effects not collected from the animal experiments (Greek "At Issue: Animal Experimentation" 26). The only reason that these experimentations remain: because the corporations generate revenue from them (Greek "At Issue: Animal Experimentation" 27). Medicine has an importance in today's world and most time the experiments used to try to expand this field often prove to be unhelpful and painful and animals need more rights to protect them from this harm. Because animals have a life, and they can feel pain and hurt in the same way that humans would feel pain, they need protection from unnecessary harm. So Tom Regan proposes the idea that "everyone's pain or frustration matters," in stating that race, gender, or DNA does not affect feelings (Regan 122). Every living thing can feel pain in the same way that other living things feel pain. When a neighbor kicks a dog, that neighbor does wrong by the dog and that "pain is pain wherever it occurs" (Regan 117). The dog feels the pain not the neighbor or the owner of the dog, just the dog. Universally felt, pain does not discriminate. Animals live on this planet and have feelings, so they have the same rights to earth and legal protection that humans have (Regan 116). This pain can be felt everywhere, from a piglet going paralyzed and suffering until its horrible death to a dog getting kicked for no reason. Animals have the same right to life as every other human being and that right should not be taken away, but instead written into a law; so it would be illegal to cause pain to an animal or take away its life. Animals "are now known to have complex brain, perceptions and emotions" (Clemmitt 4). Cattle, pigs, chickens, and other animals used for food and experiments have just as much intelligence as cats, dogs, or even humans (Clemmitt 4). So if they have the same amount of intelligence, why should they not have the right to life and other rights as humans? Pigs and chickens can do the same tasks as humans can. For example, pigs if taught "can learn to play video games" and chickens can pass down knowledge of their culture through 30 different squawks or calls (Clemmitt 4). This all gives evidence that animals deserve to life free of suffering and pain that they endure, so they need to be given more legal protection through laws. Animals should be given more legal rights to prevent harm. Animal rights activists started to demand more legal protection for animals around the 1970s. This became a bigger issue as people start to realize animals experience torture in experiments and factory farms, factory farms provide an unsafe and unhealthy environment for animals, that experiments do not benefit the development of medicines, and that animals have feelings too. In experiments, scientists chain down the animals and give animals nonideal conditions that lead to the psychological demise of the animals. In factory farms, the calves have their horns painfully removed, thumping leaves piglets paralyzed and left for the dead, and the cages confine the hogs, so that they can not turn around. All this torture leads to unhealthy and unsafe meat because the chickens receive hormones, cows eat the ground-up parts of other cows, and the antibiotics used become more and more useless. Animal Experimentation does not benefit medicine because scientists use the animals to find the effects of something they already know the effects to. All of the major medical advancements in this century have been made without animal experimentation. Animals do not have the same DNA as humans, so the experiments end up hurting both humans and animals. Animals can and always feel pain because they have just as complex brains as humans and that equates to them feeling that pain. Animals deserve rights in all cases because otherwise they will continue to keep getting hurt and tortured unless lawmakers put more harsh laws in place to protect their lives and their sanity. In the future, cows will not be tortured for their meat, chickens will not have to struggle under their own weight day-by-day, and piglets will not have to die because scientist will create meat in a lab and the animal suffering on factory farms will end (Clemmitt 2). On the back of many cosmetics today they say do not get in eyes, if this occurs, flush eyes with water for fifteen minutes and then call poison control. Where do these instructions come from? Animal experimentation. Animals getting these products put into their eyes and the scientists seeing how they react; physically and chemically and it has to stop. That pain that the person feels, it still remains the same for animal and it hurts to get these products in the eye. Animals need rights to correct human wrongs.
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Animal Testing Should Be Banned
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Animal Testing Should Be Banned

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              Ricky Gervais, an English comedian and actor, once said, "Dear intelligent people of the world, don't get shampoo in your eyes. It really stings. There. Done. Now f***ing stop torturing animals. " (Gervais). Although people may receive Mr. Gervais' words as harsh, his message contains truth, that people need to stop testing on animals. Animals need to stop being the center of laboratory and farm experiments, or at least given more rights to protect their general welfare and life. Scientists started using animals in testing in 1851 as a part of learning in the classroom at universities (ProQuest). Animals started to be used because doing the experiments on humans would be viewed as unethical and inhumane, but should not the treatment of animals be seen as unethical and inhumane too? The experiments that use animals to test everything from cosmetics to scientific advancements often offer no help to the companies. Animals used to test the effect of certain ingredients do not have the same biology as humans, so the testing often harms or kills thousands of animals and humans a year because of faulty testing (Greek "Animal Experimentation is Unscientific" 87). The same goes for the animals used to test the effect of different ingredients in our food and whether or not it causes cancer or other health conditions. This food comes from a factory farm, Dictionary. com defines it as "a farm in which animals are bred and fattened using modern industrial methods" ("Factory Farms"). Factory Farms produce many bad products, including the meat that comes from them. Factory farms produce the meat that a person would see when they walk into a grocery store. Many animal rights activists believe that the modern activist movement started in 1975 with the writing of Animal Liberation (ProQuest). From what humans put on their skin to what they put in their stomachs, animals have an impact on their everyday lives and in most cases, humans mistreat these animals. Therefore, animals deserve rights to protect their lives and sanity. Animals should be given more legal rights and protection to prevent harm caused by any animal experimentations and factory farms.
             
              The question taking charge of this movement: do animals deserve rights, if so how much? Humans first began to find interest in the way the animal body worked in 1625, when William Harvey published a book on the animal body and thus started animal experimentation (ProQuest). From then on it escalated it into the fiasco that it has become today. This then lead to the need of anti-animal cruelty laws, which in 1822, Great Britain passed the first law that banned harm against farm animals called Martin's Act (ProQuest). From the on american lawmakers passed the Animal Welfare Act, in 1966, which affects the sale, research, and showing of animals, except for mice, rats, birds, and animals on farms (ProQuest). From the on americans took the movement. For example, the U. S. Humane Act, which prevents the cruel killing of awake cattle and hogs, does not protect chickens, so they die a painful death while still in a conscious state(Clemmitt 4). If this or anything noted as abuse happens Suffolk County in New York, has a registry for animal abusers much like the ones for sex offenders (ProQuest). Many of the experiments that take place use chimps; but in 2013, the U. S. restricted testing on chimps and put the rest in retirement (ProQuest). In the past, chimps and many other animals have not been as fortunate as the chimps under this law. They did not have the same legal protection and scientists did not treat them fairly or humanely, so they would be tortured in their experiments. Animals have been able to achieve more legal protection in the last 15 years because only 10 U. S. colleges used to have animal-law majors 15 years ago, but now 130+ have this major available (Clemmitt 1). Scientists, in the past, subjected chimps to inhumane and insane experiments, not caring for their welfare. Especially in the 5 worst states for animal protection laws: Kentucky, Mississippi, Hawaii, Idaho, and North Dakota (Clemmitt 4). Some of the protection laws do not protect the farm animals on factory farms. This inhumane treatment leads to much more bad effects that affect the human environment. For instance, factory farms produce huge amounts of animal waste, which in turn contaminates the air with emissions and the water with the bacteria from the waste (Weeks 25). Cows alone produce more carbon dioxide emissions in a year than all the transportation methods, such as cars, trains, planes, and boats, combined (Lean). These cows also do not see the sun or breathe the outside air until right before they die or during the move to another barnhouse (Weeks 27). Animals need to have more legal protection than already given to them because this life would not be ideal for any creature, human or animal.
             
              Experimentation started a long time ago, but has gotten progressively worse as the years go on. Nevertheless some may still argue that when scientist designed animal experiments; it did not include torture. They designed them to make medical advancements. John C. Dalton experimenting on live animals as a part of classroom instruction as a harmless way to teach students (ProQuest). However, in the end many of the experiments make no medical breakthroughs and they torture and hurt the animals used in them. For example, three of the monkeys at the Institute for Biological Research in Silver Spring; Chester, Sarah, and Domitian (Pacheco 189). Chester led the pack of monkeys, but he felt that he could not protect them against the harm of the experiments and this made him angry at the world (Pacheco 189). Sarah would attack her foot and spin around and around, all the while crying like a baby (Pacheco 189). Domitian would attack his arm as if he did not feel it and would masturbate all the time (Pacheco 189). The experiments caused mental problems which led to the strange behavior. These same hungry monkeys, along with others, picked at their food scraps in an attempt to curb their hunger (Pacheco 188-189). These behaviors and conditions combined led to the insanity of many of the monkeys in the experiments. Conditions probably added to that fact. Research labs often have less than ideal conditions, where the monkeys live and how the scientists treat them. 70. 6% of the monkeys in the research had "disabled limbs" from the surgery in their younger years (Pacheco 189). Scientists performed these surgeries to find out what would happen if they broke or disabled a bone and how the monkeys would keep living their lives. In two of the cases, the monkeys actually had bones poking out of their skin, but "no one [had] bothered to bandage the monkeys injuries properly. . . , and antibiotics were administered only once; no lacerations were ever cleaned" (Pacheco 190). Which means that the medical care that humans expect, the monkeys did not receive. Once the humans finished with the experimentations with the monkeys in the laboratories, the monkeys went back to cages filled with filth, feces, urine, and rust (Pacheco 188). So they never got to see the bright, shiny side of life because the scientists running the experiments did not make sure that the monkeys would have a healthy, happy environment like the humans they do the experiments for do. These conditions that the monkeys lived in probably changed the results of the experiments. Scientists that use the Draize test try to prevent changes in the experimentation through many different methods. Because the rabbits in this experiment try to claw out the liquid or foreign objects from the eye, the researchers try to prevent this by putting the rabbits in restraints that only show their faces (Singer 175). But the rabbits then try to blink it out, so researchers hold open the rabbits eyes with metal clips (Singer 175). The scientists try to prevent an instinct, both human and animal, humans try to remove the object by blinking or rubbing their eye. Rabbits "squeal, claw, jump, and try to escape", which means that they show signs of distress and uncomfort during the experiments mentioned before (Singer 175). The rabbits exhibit these signs as of showing inhumanity and cruelty the experiments. Some companies that used this testing method, Revlon and Avon, Revlon specifically said that in 1977 they used about 2,000 rabbits in testing that year (Singer 176). That means that 2,000 rabbits had to go through that torture that year in only one company. Do humans need another beauty product or another aspirin in the name of hurting an animal (Singer 176)? These corporations try to sell a fantasy world of cures and beauty to their buyers, while creating a horrible world for the animals who help make those products (Singer 176), so they deserve more rights to protect their sanity and general health. The animals put through these horrible experiments do not deserve that kind of life, they deserve a life of love and happiness in the wild or domestic homes.
             
              While not in a laboratory, animals still experience torture elsewhere; for example a factory farm. Although many factory farms do not abuse their animals, the few that do exist do make national news and reflect badly on the other farms. However, only certain videos, pictures, and articles that companies release can show which farms abuse their animals and which ones do not. Farmers, even though they do not make national or local news, still abuse animals. Like the cattle in one video "were shown knock[ed] to the ground and strap[ped] down - fully conscious, in panic, eyes bulging" while awaiting slaughter (Park 122). The cows do not need to be torture before they die because like any human being they want to die a peaceful life and have a peaceful death. Farmers start the torture for cattle at a very young age with a procedure called 'dehorning' (Byer). Farmers do this procedure without giving the calf anything to take away the pain, making it a more traumatic experience for the calf (Byer). When a cow gets dehorned it "struggle[s] desperately, thrash[es], toss[es] their heads, rear[s] up, bellowing, and collasp[es] to the ground - all signs of severe pain and distress" (Byer). A cow shows the pain of the dehorning through its actions when the cow gets its horns removed. The cow being dehorned counts as a traumatic event in their life and can affect the rest of their life. Just like a traumatic event can affect a person for the rest of their life, a farmer removing the horns of a calf when it has only been living for a few days can cause distress and pain to the calf for the rest of its life (Byer). Another way in which farmers traumatize and hurt baby animals called thumping. The farmers use this technique to kill the underweight piglets, they hold the piglets by their back legs and throwing their heads into the concrete ground (Genoways 40). Yet Ted Genoways describes thumping as "legal and widely practiced" (40). More times than not, thumping does not actually kill the piglet, but instead just paralyzes it until death from starvation or suffocation. It would be more effective and a lot less detrimental if the farmers would let the piglets live, instead of using all of the resources to make that piglet just to kill it. The conditions that the animals live in these factory farms would be demeaned as awful by most humans. The standard size for a hog pen in a factory farm can be described as "two-foot-by-seven-foot' and allows the hogs of these farms to stand up and "lay down but not turn around" (Weeks 39). That means that day by day the hog sees the same thing, and by the second day that scenery would get pretty boring for both humans and animals a like. These hogs only go outside to be moved to a different barn or put into a truck for slaughter (Weeks 27). Seeing the same scenery everyday and then only seeing the sun when they get put into a truck for slaughter, factory farms provide the hogs and other animals with a tough life. Animals stuck in these factory farms live in less than ideal conditions produce a less healthy meat, so animals should receive more rights to give them better conditions to make better meat.
             
              Because the farms torture their animals, the meat that the farms produce has unhealthy qualities to it. Factory farms, which produce much of the meat served today, provide an unsafe and unhealthy environment, which in turn produces an unhealthy meat product. Factory farms, like Perdue, feed their chickens hormones, which cause them to grow fatter faster, but leaves them "debilitated, suffering from bone deformities, gait abnormalities, ruptured tendons, and metabolic diseases" (Park 122). People eat this food without knowing what the animals go through just to give them their food that they enjoy every day. Factory farms force chickens to gain much more fat and muscle faster than they would in the natural world (Park 122). This, as of today, has no known effect on the human body, but no one can tell what the effects will be in the future. Another effect of the unhealthiness of factory farms, mad cow disease. In the 1980s and 1990s mad cow disease, which can be spread by feeding ground-up infected parts of cows to other cows, caused dozens of deaths in Europe (Weeks 38). The farmers of the factory farm feed the cows parts of other cows, but ground up just because they can not buy or farm food for their cattle. This disease can also be caused by other forms of cheap protein, like poultry litter and feces (Weeks 38). Because the animals do not get the correct kind of nutrition produce a lot of animal waste, which in turn contaminates the air and water supply (Weeks 25). This side effect may contaminate a factory farm with a bacteria that farmers use antibiotics to cure, but the bacteria come back even stronger next time killing even more cattle than it would have originally (Weeks 25). Which, if a person thinks about it, giving antibiotics proves pointless because the antibiotics only make the bacteria stronger and make it more movable from species to species. Animals and humans both get sick, but humans wait until they get better, whereas farmers expect that the animals should be healthy all the time, but that would be impossible to expect from animals. According to data from the 1990s, in their lifetime Americans will eat about 23 pigs, 3 lambs, 11 cattle, 45 turkeys, and 1,097 chickens ( James 13). If humans eat all this meat, with all of these messed up conditions, only time can tell the effects on the human body. All of these pretenses will lead to ill-effects on the human body, much like experiments that use animals, so to help protect the human race animals need to be given more rights.
             
              Experiments use animals as test subjects, even though these experiments often do not have an impact on medicine. Arguably some medical advancements such as; vaccines for cholera and rabies, how malaria transmits from being to being, and coronary bypass procedures, however most modern improvements have been made without the use of animals (ProQuest). Only certain animals, like dogs or cats can legally be exempted from experimentation, noted as the "lovable" ones, but all animals can and will be loved by someone somewhere (Singer 175). But that does not matter because all animals can and do suffer in experiments, no matter how repulsive or adorable (Singer 175). Often animals do receive the basic necessities unless they 'perform' what the scientists expects. Below a picture of a monkey smoking, the caption reads that it "is forced to smoke before it is given water" (James 26). The scientists used this experiment to help figure out the causes of lung cancer and other diseases related to smoking (James 26). Now imagine a person being forced to smoke just so that they can get the water that they need for daily survival. Scientists also know that smoking has dangerous side effects on humans, so why torture and put an animal through the same pain? In addition, all the major medical advancements of this century have been made without animal experimentation; advancements such as, vaccines, MRIs, and anesthesiology (Greek "At Issue: Animal Experimentation" 25-26). These advancement take a major part in today's healthcare, and scientists created them without any harm to animals through animal experimentation. A final problem, testing also "assumes that animals and humans are similar at the cellular and molecular level", which in fact they do not possess the same genes (Greek "Animal Experimentation" 87). If humans and animals had the same DNA, then they would all be rats, humans, or monkeys, so why use something that has different DNA than humans? Using animals to see the effects of something on a human assumes that the result that the animals produce will suffice for humans, but in fact, 51. 5% of the medications released in the 1970s and 1980s, had to be relabeled because of severe side effects not collected from the animal experiments (Greek "At Issue: Animal Experimentation" 26). The only reason that these experimentations remain: because the corporations generate revenue from them (Greek "At Issue: Animal Experimentation" 27). Medicine has an importance in today's world and most time the experiments used to try to expand this field often prove to be unhelpful and painful and animals need more rights to protect them from this harm.
             
              Because animals have a life, and they can feel pain and hurt in the same way that humans would feel pain, they need protection from unnecessary harm. So Tom Regan proposes the idea that "everyone's pain or frustration matters," in stating that race, gender, or DNA does not affect feelings (Regan 122). Every living thing can feel pain in the same way that other living things feel pain. When a neighbor kicks a dog, that neighbor does wrong by the dog and that "pain is pain wherever it occurs" (Regan 117). The dog feels the pain not the neighbor or the owner of the dog, just the dog. Universally felt, pain does not discriminate. Animals live on this planet and have feelings, so they have the same rights to earth and legal protection that humans have (Regan 116). This pain can be felt everywhere, from a piglet going paralyzed and suffering until its horrible death to a dog getting kicked for no reason. Animals have the same right to life as every other human being and that right should not be taken away, but instead written into a law; so it would be illegal to cause pain to an animal or take away its life. Animals "are now known to have complex brain, perceptions and emotions" (Clemmitt 4). Cattle, pigs, chickens, and other animals used for food and experiments have just as much intelligence as cats, dogs, or even humans (Clemmitt 4). So if they have the same amount of intelligence, why should they not have the right to life and other rights as humans? Pigs and chickens can do the same tasks as humans can. For example, pigs if taught "can learn to play video games" and chickens can pass down knowledge of their culture through 30 different squawks or calls (Clemmitt 4). This all gives evidence that animals deserve to life free of suffering and pain that they endure, so they need to be given more legal protection through laws.
             
              Animals should be given more legal rights to prevent harm. Animal rights activists started to demand more legal protection for animals around the 1970s. This became a bigger issue as people start to realize animals experience torture in experiments and factory farms, factory farms provide an unsafe and unhealthy environment for animals, that experiments do not benefit the development of medicines, and that animals have feelings too. In experiments, scientists chain down the animals and give animals nonideal conditions that lead to the psychological demise of the animals. In factory farms, the calves have their horns painfully removed, thumping leaves piglets paralyzed and left for the dead, and the cages confine the hogs, so that they can not turn around. All this torture leads to unhealthy and unsafe meat because the chickens receive hormones, cows eat the ground-up parts of other cows, and the antibiotics used become more and more useless. Animal Experimentation does not benefit medicine because scientists use the animals to find the effects of something they already know the effects to. All of the major medical advancements in this century have been made without animal experimentation. Animals do not have the same DNA as humans, so the experiments end up hurting both humans and animals. Animals can and always feel pain because they have just as complex brains as humans and that equates to them feeling that pain. Animals deserve rights in all cases because otherwise they will continue to keep getting hurt and tortured unless lawmakers put more harsh laws in place to protect their lives and their sanity. In the future, cows will not be tortured for their meat, chickens will not have to struggle under their own weight day-by-day, and piglets will not have to die because scientist will create meat in a lab and the animal suffering on factory farms will end (Clemmitt 2). On the back of many cosmetics today they say do not get in eyes, if this occurs, flush eyes with water for fifteen minutes and then call poison control. Where do these instructions come from? Animal experimentation. Animals getting these products put into their eyes and the scientists seeing how they react; physically and chemically and it has to stop. That pain that the person feels, it still remains the same for animal and it hurts to get these products in the eye. Animals need rights to correct human wrongs.
             
             
Animal Testing Essay 
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