Essay Topics
Types of Essays
Essay Checklist
Word Counter
Readability Score
Essay Rewriter
Throughout time, there have been many efforts made to prevent unwanted pregnancies in those who are sexually active. Methods for contraception vary widely and can include condoms, intrauterine devices (IUD's), oral pills, hormone patches, and hormone shots. While it is more common for women to be responsible for taking or providing birth control, there has been a recent development in birth control that is primarily targeted towards men. The male birth control pill is a widely discussed idea that poses many questions about effectiveness and responsibilities of both men and women regarding pregnancy prevention. Although there are other male birth control methods available or in the works, such as a vasectomy or polymer shot, the birth control pill for men has gained a bit of interest lately. This pill would allow men and women to share contraceptive issues more fairly, rather than having the brunt of the matter being pushed solely on women as they have been thus far. Men would be able to take on more sexual responsibility, which could allow women to benefit from increased sex drive and reduction of other hormone induced side effects. This would take a great burden off of women, enable them to have more sexual freedom, and avoid potential long-term fertility effects that female birth controls can cause. While this is a good idea in theory, the main reason that the male birth control pill has not taken off and become very popular is because men simply don't care or have an interest in this sort of thing. An attempt to market male birth control occurred in the 1970's, but it couldn't gain enough momentum to entice people or make an impression. Since they are not the ones at risk of getting pregnant, men are much more likely to be irresponsible in maintaining a regular schedule of taking the pill and managing things such as refills or medical appointments associated with their prescription. This uncaring attitude or apathetic view would put both sexual partners at an even higher risk of having an unwanted pregnancy. Since men have typically been shown to have this mindset, it is a gamble to put them in full control of contraception duties. In addition to the responsibility factor, men are much less likely than women to effectively deal with the possible side effects that come along with taking birth control. These effects can include growth of the prostate gland, acne, weight gain, and irregular liver function. Most men are quite selfish when it comes to changing their bodies or developing unwanted health problems, so they wouldn't want to use the pill for this reason. Men are not very open to risking their own health to ensure responsible sex, but they give little thought as to how birth control can affect women and typically expect them to take the pill with its possibly negative health risks without hesitation. Attitudes towards the male birth control differ to that of women's because the two sexes are perceived differently when talking about sexual health and the prevention of unwanted pregnancies. Males are generally seen as undependable because they are used to instant gratification and have nothing to lose in some cases, while women are viewed as trustworthy and able to take full responsibility because they would be the one's getting pregnant. Even though a male pill would be a progressive step towards gender equality, the majority of men don't seem ready to being accountable for their sexual actions and pregnancy prevention in this way quite yet. Since the male birth control pill has come such a long way so far, hopefully it will continue to gain increasing interest over time so that there can be even responsibilities shared between partners who are sexually active and avoiding unwanted pregnancies.
Essay Writing Checklist
The following guidelines are designed to give students a checklist to use, whether they are revising individually or as part of a peer review team.
Introduction
  • Is the main idea (i.e., the writer's opinion of the story title) stated clearly?
  • Is the introductory paragraph interesting? Does it make the reader want to keep on reading?
Body Paragraph
  • Does each body paragraph have a clear topic sentence that is related to the main idea of the essay?
  • Does each body paragraph include specific information from the text(including quoted evidence from the text, if required by the instructor)that supports the topic sentence?
  • Is there a clear plan for the order of the body paragraphs (i.e., order of importance, chronology in the story, etc.)?
  • Does each body paragraph transition smoothly to the next?
Conclusion
  • Is the main idea of the essay restated in different words?
  • Are the supporting ideas summarized succinctly and clearly?
  • Is the concluding paragraph interesting? Does it leave an impression on the reader?
Overall Essay
  • Is any important material left unsaid?
  • Is any material repetitious and unnecessary?
  • Has the writer tried to incorporate "voice" in the essay so that it has his/her distinctive mark?
  • Are there changes needed in word choice, sentence length and structure, etc.?
  • Are the quotations (if required) properly cited?
  • Has the essay been proofread for spelling, punctuation, grammar, etc.?
  • Does the essay have an interesting and appropriate title?
An Introduction to the Various Birth Control Methods
Trending Essay Topics
Explore today's trending essay topics:
Reference
Feel free to use content on this page for your website, blog or paper we only ask that you reference content back to us. Use the following code to link this page:
Terms · Privacy · Contact
Essay Topics © 2019

An Introduction To The Various Birth Control Methods

Words: 633    Pages: 2    Paragraphs: 5    Sentences: 22    Read Time: 02:18
Highlight Text to add correction. Use an editor to spell check essay.
              Throughout time, there have been many efforts made to prevent unwanted pregnancies in those who are sexually active. Methods for contraception vary widely and can include condoms, intrauterine devices (IUD's), oral pills, hormone patches, and hormone shots. While it is more common for women to be responsible for taking or providing birth control, there has been a recent development in birth control that is primarily targeted towards men. The male birth control pill is a widely discussed idea that poses many questions about effectiveness and responsibilities of both men and women regarding pregnancy prevention.
             
              Although there are other male birth control methods available or in the works, such as a vasectomy or polymer shot, the birth control pill for men has gained a bit of interest lately. This pill would allow men and women to share contraceptive issues more fairly, rather than having the brunt of the matter being pushed solely on women as they have been thus far. Men would be able to take on more sexual responsibility, which could allow women to benefit from increased sex drive and reduction of other hormone induced side effects. This would take a great burden off of women, enable them to have more sexual freedom, and avoid potential long-term fertility effects that female birth controls can cause.
             
              While this is a good idea in theory, the main reason that the male birth control pill has not taken off and become very popular is because men simply don't care or have an interest in this sort of thing. An attempt to market male birth control occurred in the 1970's, but it couldn't gain enough momentum to entice people or make an impression. Since they are not the ones at risk of getting pregnant, men are much more likely to be irresponsible in maintaining a regular schedule of taking the pill and managing things such as refills or medical appointments associated with their prescription. This uncaring attitude or apathetic view would put both sexual partners at an even higher risk of having an unwanted pregnancy. Since men have typically been shown to have this mindset, it is a gamble to put them in full control of contraception duties.
             
              In addition to the responsibility factor, men are much less likely than women to effectively deal with the possible side effects that come along with taking birth control. These effects can include growth of the prostate gland, acne, weight gain, and irregular liver function. Most men are quite selfish when it comes to changing their bodies or developing unwanted health problems, so they wouldn't want to use the pill for this reason. Men are not very open to risking their own health to ensure responsible sex, but they give little thought as to how birth control can affect women and typically expect them to take the pill with its possibly negative health risks without hesitation.
             
              Attitudes towards the male birth control differ to that of women's because the two sexes are perceived differently when talking about sexual health and the prevention of unwanted pregnancies. Males are generally seen as undependable because they are used to instant gratification and have nothing to lose in some cases, while women are viewed as trustworthy and able to take full responsibility because they would be the one's getting pregnant. Even though a male pill would be a progressive step towards gender equality, the majority of men don't seem ready to being accountable for their sexual actions and pregnancy prevention in this way quite yet. Since the male birth control pill has come such a long way so far, hopefully it will continue to gain increasing interest over time so that there can be even responsibilities shared between partners who are sexually active and avoiding unwanted pregnancies.
Birth Control Essay 
Tip: Use our Essay Rewriter to rewrite this essay and remove plagiarism.

Add Notes

Have suggestions, comments or ideas? Please share below. Don't forget to tag a friend or classmate.
clear
Formatting Help
Submit
Sitemap