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Placing monetary value on an individual's life is measured not by the way an individual has lived, but rather the individual's income; at least that is how society views life. Every individual values life from a different perspective. And while every human will find value in life, those values will not be the same as everybody else. Some people will value life as a privilege and believe life should be taken seriously while considering the consequences in every decision contemplated while others will live in the fast lane with an irresponsible mindset. Individuals also view life differently depending on the circumstances. However, no matter how an individual views life, it seems to be impossible to extract emotion out of any decision. Society, on the other hand, values life by placing a monetary value on a human life. Society also has no choice but to set emotion aside when setting that monetary value. The government will use that value to compensate a family who has just lost a love one. However, some families mistake the compensation for "replacing" the lost soul and become indignant. There are many alternatives when it comes to compensating the victim's family. In most times, society always ends up placing a value on an individual based on his/her income. Furthermore, while society delivers compensation to families, society also believes in compensation for an individual's pain and suffering. There are times society should place a monetary value on life, while having restrictions. Many individuals have different aspects as to how life should be valued. Some individuals live life a day at a time while attempting to make the most as if their last breath was upcoming. In a Stanford Commencement in 2005, Apple CEO Steve Jobs quoted in his lecture to Stanford students, "...for the past 33 years, I have looked in the mirror every day and asked myself: If today were the last day of my life, would I want to do what I am about to do today?"(17) Jobs' quote personifies the character and value some individuals take into account. Yet, some humans live life as a joke and do not contain morals or indisputable imperative values, such as family values. However, some individuals will experience an event that can forever impact a human's outlook on life. For example, a few former NFL players have been experienced Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, a severe disease that shuts down the function of muscles. After realizing the attributes one has lost, people will realize how precious life is and will start to value life more than ever. To illustrate the point, another quote from Jobs' lecture is when Jobs states after undergoing pancreatic cancer surgery "I had the surgery and I'm fine now. This was the closest I've been to facing death, and I hope it's the closest I get for a few more decades...Your time is limited, so don't waste it living someone else's life."(21)(23) After reading this citation, one can interpret the importance of living and to never misuse the time given to live to seek value in life. However, this essay is not to point how an individual should live, but rather how society values life despite how any individual decides to live. Society eyes life as a totally different subject. Society values life by the belief of placing monetary value on an individual despite their views or how humans have made choices regardless of the good or bad outcomes while also extracting emotion. For example, in What Is a Life Worth? by Amanda Ripley, and article from TIME magazine wrote "when a man died, he took his legal claims with him. And so the thinking went for most of the century, until something unheard of began to happen. The courts started to put a dollar value on a life-after death."(1) This very quote displays the unprecedented action of how society began to place monetary value on a human being. Furthermore, many individuals will question why humanity will undertake such an action? Many individuals ponder as to why and how society places monetary value on human life? Civilization places monetary value to compensate for a families loss of a family member who has died from a tragic event or natural causes if the victim had life insurance. Setting emotions aside, society is not attempting to replace the lost soul, but rather compensating for the financial void left for the family to uphold. Many individuals believe this method compares to trading blood for money, which in some cases, will contribute to a families recovery following a passing of a loved one. For example, a family can receive a compensation fund from life insurance, receiving x amount of dollars based on the victim's policy chosen at the time of death which is also based on the victim's income. However, some individuals do not obtain life insurance due to finance dilemmas and should pursue life insurance as the main priority due to the fact that if a victim is killed in a car accident, society will compensate the family of the victim based on his/her income. However, if a victim is killed in an enormous tragic event such as 9/11, the government will step in and provide reparations for the family. Another statement in Ripley's article, special master Kenneth Feinberg states how the government had to compensate for the victims families of 9/11. He puts the concept into an easy perspective when he points out the fact that the government had to estimate the victim's income over the course of their lifetime had the planes never crashed.(7) This points out how the government will accumulate the amount of dollars society will compensate for while perfectly exemplifying how society places value on humans. Although some may argue this action is completely ridiculous, it is only ethical to think that this method will provide the equality of justice needed to appease some families because the individual would have presumably made that specific amount if the event never happened. Compensating families is the right action to take. However, society needs to know how when to prevent themselves from delivering more money than families need. Humanity should place a monetary value on a human life only when it is right. Society believes that individuals are worth money after the time of death to support the vacant financial obstacle. While society is performing the correct deed, some families become infuriated after realizing how much money their family member was worth. Several families sue the government due to the fact that they believe the amount received was not enough. While society can not sympathize over the family's loss, families additionally win other lawsuits for excess and unnecessary money. Most families will convince themselves that the compensation was not enough and become greedy until appeased by society. Most families, because of having a spouse and children, believe they should receive a bonus for having a family. This dilemma is called the non-economic loss. For instance, another statement in What Is a Life Worth?, Feinberg discusses the non-economic loss side of the dilemma when he states that families should receive a $50,000 bonus for each child and spouse due to the "pain and suffering" perspective, leading envy for families and actually addressing how merciless the so called "legal system" actually is.(7) This is where society needs to draw the line. This method of compensation is all based on attitude. And in Ripley's article, she talks about David Gordenstein, a victim who lost his wife on American Flight 11, and states, "But he would rather devote his life to raising his two young daughters than pursuing a lawsuit. He will probably file a claim with the federal fund; which he acknowledged is not perfect. "I am proud of what my country has tried to do. I think the intention is noble."(29) This illustration indicates the ethical attitude Americans should consider by undertaking the main priorities rather than devoting one's time to accomplish an unnecessary action. The reparation was a sign of nobility and families should not be compensated for such a common criteria many individuals fulfill. An additional statement in What is Life Worth? by Amanda Ripley, an anonymous Florida resident states, "that some individuals are living in such a rare and well-gilded ivory tower that they feel $250,000 is not sufficient compensation."(14) This exemplifies the logical stand point that society compensates for a non-economic loss and should prevent delivering compensation to families who have already received money prior to filing a claim prevent some families of becoming selfish after have receiving compensation. With all information considered, society should place a monetary value on humanity while abiding to the omission of non-economic loss. The value of life can vary depending on an individual's point of view. While every human will discover value in life from different environments and circumstances, society will always value life completely differently from humans. Society will value life by appointing a value varying from an individual's life insurance policy and income. The "value" set on humans will be the amount the government will compensate to a family after an individual has passed. And while the "value" will often lead invalid intentions to families, it means no harm. However, society should not deliver reparations for non-economic losses. Value on human life is given to every individual, and certain aspects of one's life contribute to that number. It is up to the person themselves to discover certain values that will lead to happiness and cause life to seem precious. Do not spend valuable time living life to somebody else's expectations because in the end, society is going to ignore how you have lived and pursue life insurance immediately.
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What Is a Life Worth?
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What Is A Life Worth?

Words: 1630    Pages: 6    Paragraphs: 8    Sentences: 85    Read Time: 05:55
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              Placing monetary value on an individual's life is measured not by the way an individual has lived, but rather the individual's income; at least that is how society views life. Every individual values life from a different perspective. And while every human will find value in life, those values will not be the same as everybody else. Some people will value life as a privilege and believe life should be taken seriously while considering the consequences in every decision contemplated while others will live in the fast lane with an irresponsible mindset. Individuals also view life differently depending on the circumstances. However, no matter how an individual views life, it seems to be impossible to extract emotion out of any decision. Society, on the other hand, values life by placing a monetary value on a human life. Society also has no choice but to set emotion aside when setting that monetary value. The government will use that value to compensate a family who has just lost a love one. However, some families mistake the compensation for "replacing" the lost soul and become indignant. There are many alternatives when it comes to compensating the victim's family. In most times, society always ends up placing a value on an individual based on his/her income. Furthermore, while society delivers compensation to families, society also believes in compensation for an individual's pain and suffering. There are times society should place a monetary value on life, while having restrictions.
             
              Many individuals have different aspects as to how life should be valued. Some individuals live life a day at a time while attempting to make the most as if their last breath was upcoming. In a Stanford Commencement in 2005, Apple CEO Steve Jobs quoted in his lecture to Stanford students, ". . . for the past 33 years, I have looked in the mirror every day and asked myself: If today were the last day of my life, would I want to do what I am about to do today? "(17) Jobs' quote personifies the character and value some individuals take into account. Yet, some humans live life as a joke and do not contain morals or indisputable imperative values, such as family values. However, some individuals will experience an event that can forever impact a human's outlook on life. For example, a few former NFL players have been experienced Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, a severe disease that shuts down the function of muscles. After realizing the attributes one has lost, people will realize how precious life is and will start to value life more than ever. To illustrate the point, another quote from Jobs' lecture is when Jobs states after undergoing pancreatic cancer surgery "I had the surgery and I'm fine now. This was the closest I've been to facing death, and I hope it's the closest I get for a few more decades. . . Your time is limited, so don't waste it living someone else's life. "(21)(23) After reading this citation, one can interpret the importance of living and to never misuse the time given to live to seek value in life. However, this essay is not to point how an individual should live, but rather how society values life despite how any individual decides to live.
             
              Society eyes life as a totally different subject. Society values life by the belief of placing monetary value on an individual despite their views or how humans have made choices regardless of the good or bad outcomes while also extracting emotion. For example, in What Is a Life Worth? by Amanda Ripley, and article from TIME magazine wrote "when a man died, he took his legal claims with him. And so the thinking went for most of the century, until something unheard of began to happen. The courts started to put a dollar value on a life-after death. "(1) This very quote displays the unprecedented action of how society began to place monetary value on a human being. Furthermore, many individuals will question why humanity will undertake such an action?
             
              Many individuals ponder as to why and how society places monetary value on human life? Civilization places monetary value to compensate for a families loss of a family member who has died from a tragic event or natural causes if the victim had life insurance. Setting emotions aside, society is not attempting to replace the lost soul, but rather compensating for the financial void left for the family to uphold. Many individuals believe this method compares to trading blood for money, which in some cases, will contribute to a families recovery following a passing of a loved one. For example, a family can receive a compensation fund from life insurance, receiving x amount of dollars based on the victim's policy chosen at the time of death which is also based on the victim's income. However, some individuals do not obtain life insurance due to finance dilemmas and should pursue life insurance as the main priority due to the fact that if a victim is killed in a car accident, society will compensate the family of the victim based on his/her income. However, if a victim is killed in an enormous tragic event such as 9/11, the government will step in and provide reparations for the family.
             
              Another statement in Ripley's article, special master Kenneth Feinberg states how the government had to compensate for the victims families of 9/11. He puts the concept into an easy perspective when he points out the fact that the government had to estimate the victim's income over the course of their lifetime had the planes never crashed. (7) This points out how the government will accumulate the amount of dollars society will compensate for while perfectly exemplifying how society places value on humans. Although some may argue this action is completely ridiculous, it is only ethical to think that this method will provide the equality of justice needed to appease some families because the individual would have presumably made that specific amount if the event never happened. Compensating families is the right action to take. However, society needs to know how when to prevent themselves from delivering more money than families need.
             
              Humanity should place a monetary value on a human life only when it is right. Society believes that individuals are worth money after the time of death to support the vacant financial obstacle. While society is performing the correct deed, some families become infuriated after realizing how much money their family member was worth. Several families sue the government due to the fact that they believe the amount received was not enough. While society can not sympathize over the family's loss, families additionally win other lawsuits for excess and unnecessary money. Most families will convince themselves that the compensation was not enough and become greedy until appeased by society. Most families, because of having a spouse and children, believe they should receive a bonus for having a family. This dilemma is called the non-economic loss. For instance, another statement in What Is a Life Worth? , Feinberg discusses the non-economic loss side of the dilemma when he states that families should receive a $50,000 bonus for each child and spouse due to the "pain and suffering" perspective, leading envy for families and actually addressing how merciless the so called "legal system" actually is. (7) This is where society needs to draw the line.
             
              This method of compensation is all based on attitude. And in Ripley's article, she talks about David Gordenstein, a victim who lost his wife on American Flight 11, and states, "But he would rather devote his life to raising his two young daughters than pursuing a lawsuit. He will probably file a claim with the federal fund; which he acknowledged is not perfect. "I am proud of what my country has tried to do. I think the intention is noble. "(29) This illustration indicates the ethical attitude Americans should consider by undertaking the main priorities rather than devoting one's time to accomplish an unnecessary action. The reparation was a sign of nobility and families should not be compensated for such a common criteria many individuals fulfill. An additional statement in What is Life Worth? by Amanda Ripley, an anonymous Florida resident states, "that some individuals are living in such a rare and well-gilded ivory tower that they feel $250,000 is not sufficient compensation. "(14) This exemplifies the logical stand point that society compensates for a non-economic loss and should prevent delivering compensation to families who have already received money prior to filing a claim prevent some families of becoming selfish after have receiving compensation.
             
              With all information considered, society should place a monetary value on humanity while abiding to the omission of non-economic loss. The value of life can vary depending on an individual's point of view. While every human will discover value in life from different environments and circumstances, society will always value life completely differently from humans. Society will value life by appointing a value varying from an individual's life insurance policy and income. The "value" set on humans will be the amount the government will compensate to a family after an individual has passed. And while the "value" will often lead invalid intentions to families, it means no harm. However, society should not deliver reparations for non-economic losses. Value on human life is given to every individual, and certain aspects of one's life contribute to that number. It is up to the person themselves to discover certain values that will lead to happiness and cause life to seem precious. Do not spend valuable time living life to somebody else's expectations because in the end, society is going to ignore how you have lived and pursue life insurance immediately.
             
Life Essay 
Ripley, Amanda. "What Is a Life Worth?" TIME 11 Feb. 2002. 22-27. Print.
Jobs, Steve. Commencement Address. Stanford University Commencement Weekend. Stanford, CA.
12 June 2005. Address.
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