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Teenage pregnancy during the late 1990s has risen tremendously throughout the years. Many studies have found that the number one age groups of teenagers that become pregnant are between the ages of 15 and 16. This age group is entering a world of its own called high school filled with homework, parties, and last but not least sex. In our modern society, safe sex has become a major concern in the United States. As early as elementary school, children are learning about the "birds and the bees". Today, sex is a subject of conversation everywhere and is considered a social topic. You can go just about anywhere and hear about sex, and the media is a very big one. However, despite information that is now available on safe sex 53 percent of young women are having, or have had, unprotected sex (Chudnofsky 54). That is a very big percentage of people having sex which greatly increases their risk of catching a sexually transmitted disease or even becoming pregnant. An increase in reported sexually transmitted diseases among young teens has prompted many communities to take action to protect their youth. One proven method is to provide comprehensive sexuality education along with school based programs that make birth control and contraceptives available to sexually active youth. Numerous national health organizations have adopted policies in support of school birth control availability. It is a very big problem these days. A teenager that gets pregnant has nothing to look forward to in their life. It can really ruin a young person's life. Some people say that having birth control or contraceptives in school will send the wrong message and encourage and enable teens to be more curious about sex. A lot of people say that is not true. Sexual activity did not increase among teens that were already sexually active, nor among youth who had never have sex before. Most schools that have started these clinics that distribute birth control have had very positive results. There are a lot of programs designed to improve access to contraceptives such as family planning services, family planning clinics, and other health settings, school-based health centers, and condom-availability programs located in schools. Having birth control available did exactly what most people hoped that it would do. It didn't get kids to have sex, but it did get them to use condoms if they were already having sex. About half of high school students said that they have had sex, and nearly 60 percent of them report using protection in their last encounter. This study was based on a youth behavior survey of more that 4,100 student at 59 high schools, about 15 percent of which had birth control programs (Guttmacher Condom). School-based health clinics provide affordable primary health care services to students who otherwise might not have access to or the means of transportation to such services. They also dispense contraceptives, either devices themselves or prescriptions to be filled elsewhere. When school-based clinics are well-staffed and well-run and also dispense contraceptives, they have many of the characteristics of ideal reproductive health programs; that is, their location is convenient to the students, they reach both females and males, they provide comprehensive health services, they are confidential, their staff are selected and trained to work with adolescents, they can easily conduct follow-up, their services are free, and they can integrate education, counseling, and medical services. More than 300 schools without school-based clinics have begun making condoms available through school counselors, nurses, teachers, vending machines, or baskets. These schools are in addition to about 100 schools that make condoms available to students through school-based clinics. The solution is very easy. All that most school boards would have to do is to start some kind of clinic or even just a place that they would distribute birth control and contraceptives so that the children would have easy access to free birth control to prevent the problems with teen pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases (Becky School). There are a lot of ways to get some sort of birth control but the easiest and most convenient is the school clinics. Many parents prefer abstinence for their children but that doesn't always work. This is the best way to protect all of the sexually active teenagers that are in school from getting pregnant and messing up their lives and their future.
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Teenage Pregnancy and birth control in schools essay
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Teenage Pregnancy And Birth Control In Schools Essay

Words: 719    Pages: 3    Paragraphs: 9    Sentences: 35    Read Time: 02:36
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              Teenage pregnancy during the late 1990s has risen tremendously throughout the years. Many studies have found that the number one age groups of teenagers that become pregnant are between the ages of 15 and 16. This age group is entering a world of its own called high school filled with homework, parties, and last but not least sex.
             
             
              In our modern society, safe sex has become a major concern in the United States. As early as elementary school, children are learning about the "birds and the bees". Today, sex is a subject of conversation everywhere and is considered a social topic. You can go just about anywhere and hear about sex, and the media is a very big one. However, despite information that is now available on safe sex 53 percent of young women are having, or have had, unprotected sex (Chudnofsky 54). That is a very big percentage of people having sex which greatly increases their risk of catching a sexually transmitted disease or even becoming pregnant.
             
              An increase in reported sexually transmitted diseases among young teens has prompted many communities to take action to protect their youth. One proven method is to provide comprehensive sexuality education along with school based programs that make birth control and contraceptives available to sexually active youth. Numerous national health organizations have adopted policies in support of school birth control availability.
             
              It is a very big problem these days. A teenager that gets pregnant has nothing to look forward to in their life. It can really ruin a young person's life. Some people say that having birth control or contraceptives in school will send the wrong message and encourage and enable teens to be more curious about sex. A lot of people say that is not true. Sexual activity did not increase among teens that were already sexually active, nor among youth who had never have sex before. Most schools that have started these clinics that distribute birth control have had very positive results.
             
              There are a lot of programs designed to improve access to contraceptives such as family planning services, family planning clinics, and other health settings, school-based health centers, and condom-availability programs located in schools.
             
              Having birth control available did exactly what most people hoped that it would do. It didn't get kids to have sex, but it did get them to use condoms if they were already having sex. About half of high school students said that they have had sex, and nearly 60 percent of them report using protection in their last encounter. This study was based on a youth behavior survey of more that 4,100 student at 59 high schools, about 15 percent of which had birth control programs (Guttmacher Condom).
             
              School-based health clinics provide affordable primary health care services to students who otherwise might not have access to or the means of transportation to such services. They also dispense contraceptives, either devices themselves or prescriptions to be filled elsewhere. When school-based clinics are well-staffed and well-run and also dispense contraceptives, they have many of the characteristics of ideal reproductive health programs; that is, their location is convenient to the students, they reach both females and males, they provide comprehensive health services, they are confidential, their staff are selected and trained to work with adolescents, they can easily conduct follow-up, their services are free, and they can integrate education, counseling, and medical services. More than 300 schools without school-based clinics have begun making condoms available through school counselors, nurses, teachers, vending machines, or baskets. These schools are in addition to about 100 schools that make condoms available to students through school-based clinics.
             
              The solution is very easy. All that most school boards would have to do is to start some kind of clinic or even just a place that they would distribute birth control and contraceptives so that the children would have easy access to free birth control to prevent the problems with teen pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases (Becky School).
             
              There are a lot of ways to get some sort of birth control but the easiest and most convenient is the school clinics. Many parents prefer abstinence for their children but that doesn't always work. This is the best way to protect all of the sexually active teenagers that are in school from getting pregnant and messing up their lives and their future.
Birth Control Essay 
Ham, Becky. "School Clinics: Best Way to Get Birth Control to Students", Center for the Advancement of Health, 30 October 2003, 23 April 2004,

Chudnofsky, Lisa. "Young People and Sex", Cosmopolitan Magazine, 12 February 2004, 23 April 2004,

Guttmacher, Lieberman L. Condom availability in New York City public high schools: relationships to condom use and sexual behavior, 12 January 2004, 23 April 2004,
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