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"Love is as much of an object as an obsession, everybody wants it, everybody seeks it, but few ever achieve it" (Judalet). True love is hard to find and hard to keep; many spend their lives in search of that one person who makes their life worth living. In The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald, Jay Gatsby is obsessively in love with Daisy and never wanes in his attempts to attain her. Jay Gatsby has always wanted to be rich; his main motivation in acquiring his fortune is his love for Daisy Buchanan, whom he met as a young military officer in Louisville. Jay Gatsby is simply a love obsessed romantic, not a stalker; he idolizes Daisy Buchanan in hopes of a reciprocated love, and Gatsby does not want to dominate Daisy, so he passionately spends his life trying to gain her instead of possessing her. Jay Gatsby admires Daisy Buchanan as an idealistic person whom he loves and expects love in return. The first thought, of wrongs being righted, is proven by Gatsby's belief that Daisy's marriage and love for Tom Buchanan is spurious. Gatsby believes, beyond any shadow of doubt, that he loves Daisy in the truest possible way, and he wants his relationship with Daisy to be exactly the same as it was before he left Louisville. When there is a flashback to the times he spent with Daisy, Nick says, "His heart beat faster and faster as Daisy's white face came up to his own. He knew that when he kissed this girl, and forever wed his unutterable visions to her perishable breath, his mind would never romp again like the mind of God. Then he kissed her. At his lips' touch she blossomed for him like a flower and the incarnation was complete" (Fitzgerald 117). This shows how Gatsby perceives Daisy as a perfect girl who makes his life complete. Gatsby makes Daisy the single focus of his future. Gatsby's life revolves around his ambitions being permanently attached to Daisy's representation. To him Daisy is the ideal women, and she is everything that he wants. He believes that time has no bearing on anything whatsoever, and therefore believes he can successfully rekindle his lost love. Time does not change things, and he believes that what was once true is always true in love. Gatsby values the ideal that one can repeat the past, if one chooses to do so. He holds these beliefs strongly and, therefore believes that after attaining Daisy, their lives would be complete with splendor and happiness. Another example that shows how Gatsby admires Daisy and views her as sheer perfection is when he meets Daisy at her house. Gatsby finds Daisy eagerly desirable, and he overlooks her past relationships, "It excited him too that many men had already loved Daisy- it increased her value in his eyes" (156). This shows how Gatsby still wants Daisy, and he understands her value. He believes that since she is adored by many, she is more likeable and valuable. He has turned Daisy into his idea of a perfect woman, without flaws or problems. He has this image in his own mind that Daisy is absolutely perfect and flawless. Gatsby wants Daisy even more because everyone loves her. Gatsby loves her because everyone else does, and if he can attain Daisy than that shows that he is worthy of this passionate love. Jay Gatsby loves Daisy Buchanan for the happiness she brings him and expects Daisy to return that love. Gatsby doesn't want to control Daisy, so he ardently spends his life trying to attain her instead of possessing her. This is shown when he purposely buys a large estate right in front of Daisy's mansion, and he is able to see Daisy right across from the bay. Jordan Baker informs Nick about her mysterious conversation with Gatsby, and Gatsby's love for Daisy Buchanan. Nick is astonished by Gatsby's unwavering attempts at meeting Daisy and he says, "The modesty of the demand shook me. He had waited five years and bought a mansion where he dispensed starlight to casual moths so that he could 'come over' some afternoon to a stranger's garden" (83). With having Jordan suggest such a plan to have Daisy over, Nick sees that Gatsby's love represents the American Dream itself. Gatsby's irresistible longing to pursue Daisy, and his belief that hopefully one day he will attain her is linked to his boundless optimism with which he goes about achieving his dream. It is clear that Gatsby chose to buy his house so he could see Daisy's house across the bay. Gatsby decides to win Daisy back, and his first step is to buy a house in West Egg. His house is across the bay from Daisy's house, and he can see a green light at the end of Daisy's dock which represents his hope that one day Daisy will become his. This proves that everything Gatsby does is to win back Daisy's love. He has thrown grandiose parties for five years in the hope that Daisy will show up to at least one of them. This shows that Gatsby is truly head over heels in love with Daisy, and he never ceases in his attempts to pursue her. Another example of Gatsby's impressive love for Daisy is when Nick is talking to Mr. Wolfshiem at the Forty-second Street cellar, and Mr. Wolfshiem informs Nick about Gatsby's pure intentions. Mr. Wolfshiem acknowledges, "Yeah, Gatsby's very careful about women. He would never so much as look at a friend's wife" (77). This shows that Gatsby's dream of finding his true love, Daisy, and getting married to her, keeps him from having affairs with other women. Without Gatsby even knowing it, through his ways of staying away from other women and only looking for one certain one, he made himself a truly obsessed romantic who is crazy over one girl, Daisy. He is hopelessly and madly in love with Daisy, and he could never even think about looking at any other girl. Gatsby's life revolves around Daisy, and everything he does is in an attempt to pursue Daisy. Gatsby spends his life passionately trying to prove his worth to Daisy instead of possessing her or dominating her. Some say that Jay Gatsby is a creepy stalker because he pursued Daisy Buchanan stealthily. However, this is inaccurate because Daisy Buchanan was aware of Gatsby's impassionate love for her and mutual feelings were present between the two. This is proven when Gatsby invites Nick and Daisy over to his house, where he shows them his possessions. Daisy is overwhelmed by Gatsby's luxurious lifestyle, and she starts to shed tears of joy and Gatsby glows, "Suddenly, with a strained sound, Daisy bent her head into the shirts and began to cry stormily. They're such beautiful shirts," she sobbed, her voice muffled in the thick folds. It makes me sad because I've never seen such- such beautiful shirts before" (98). This shows how Daisy is so in love with Gatsby, and she can't even handle being near his shirts. This also proves that Gatsby is not a stalker because his feelings are reciprocated by Daisy and mutually exclusive. Daisy is pleased with Gatsby's attention and sees their affair as somewhat special and poignant. For this reason, both Gatsby and Daisy have feelings for one another, and Gatsby's attention towards Daisy is not stalker like. In addition, another example that shows Gatsby is not a stalker is when Daisy starts complaining of her boredom, and she asks Gatsby if he wants to go into the city. In response, "Gatsby's eyes floated toward her. Their eyes met, and they stared together at each other, alone in space. With an effort she glanced down at the table. You always look so cool. She had told him that she loved him and Tom Buchanan saw" (125). This shows how Daisy confesses her love in a bizarre and allusive way. She sees Gatsby as a potential lover and still has feelings for him. For this reason, Gatsby is not a stalker because Daisy is pleased with Gatsby and has feelings for him. In this case, both Gatsby and Daisy love one another, but the circumstances of the times are keeping them apart. Gatsby is not a creepy stalker due to the fact that both Daisy and Gatsby have had a memorable past that Gatsby just wants to relive and bring back to life. Jay Gatsby is purely a devoted romantic; not a stalker, he adores Daisy Buchanan in hopes of a reciprocated love, and Gatsby doesn't want to control Daisy, so he avidly spends his life trying to gain her instead of possessing her. Jay Gatsby truly loves Daisy for the excitement that she provides him with and Gatsby plans his future with Daisy. Gatsby spends his life proving his worth to Daisy instead of attempting to subordinate her. Jay Gatsby's quixotic passion for Daisy Buchanan remains unwavering in hopes of a reciprocation of love which all comes to an end with Gatsby's murder. How far would you go to keep the hopes of love alive? What would one value more, unconditional love or conditional love?
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The Theme of Love in The Great Gatsby
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The Theme Of Love In The Great Gatsby

Words: 1563    Pages: 6    Paragraphs: 5    Sentences: 82    Read Time: 05:41
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              "Love is as much of an object as an obsession, everybody wants it, everybody seeks it, but few ever achieve it" (Judalet). True love is hard to find and hard to keep; many spend their lives in search of that one person who makes their life worth living. In The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald, Jay Gatsby is obsessively in love with Daisy and never wanes in his attempts to attain her. Jay Gatsby has always wanted to be rich; his main motivation in acquiring his fortune is his love for Daisy Buchanan, whom he met as a young military officer in Louisville. Jay Gatsby is simply a love obsessed romantic, not a stalker; he idolizes Daisy Buchanan in hopes of a reciprocated love, and Gatsby does not want to dominate Daisy, so he passionately spends his life trying to gain her instead of possessing her.
             
             
              Jay Gatsby admires Daisy Buchanan as an idealistic person whom he loves and expects love in return. The first thought, of wrongs being righted, is proven by Gatsby's belief that Daisy's marriage and love for Tom Buchanan is spurious. Gatsby believes, beyond any shadow of doubt, that he loves Daisy in the truest possible way, and he wants his relationship with Daisy to be exactly the same as it was before he left Louisville. When there is a flashback to the times he spent with Daisy, Nick says, "His heart beat faster and faster as Daisy's white face came up to his own. He knew that when he kissed this girl, and forever wed his unutterable visions to her perishable breath, his mind would never romp again like the mind of God. Then he kissed her. At his lips' touch she blossomed for him like a flower and the incarnation was complete" (Fitzgerald 117). This shows how Gatsby perceives Daisy as a perfect girl who makes his life complete. Gatsby makes Daisy the single focus of his future. Gatsby's life revolves around his ambitions being permanently attached to Daisy's representation. To him Daisy is the ideal women, and she is everything that he wants. He believes that time has no bearing on anything whatsoever, and therefore believes he can successfully rekindle his lost love. Time does not change things, and he believes that what was once true is always true in love. Gatsby values the ideal that one can repeat the past, if one chooses to do so. He holds these beliefs strongly and, therefore believes that after attaining Daisy, their lives would be complete with splendor and happiness. Another example that shows how Gatsby admires Daisy and views her as sheer perfection is when he meets Daisy at her house. Gatsby finds Daisy eagerly desirable, and he overlooks her past relationships, "It excited him too that many men had already loved Daisy- it increased her value in his eyes" (156). This shows how Gatsby still wants Daisy, and he understands her value. He believes that since she is adored by many, she is more likeable and valuable. He has turned Daisy into his idea of a perfect woman, without flaws or problems. He has this image in his own mind that Daisy is absolutely perfect and flawless. Gatsby wants Daisy even more because everyone loves her. Gatsby loves her because everyone else does, and if he can attain Daisy than that shows that he is worthy of this passionate love. Jay Gatsby loves Daisy Buchanan for the happiness she brings him and expects Daisy to return that love.
             
              Gatsby doesn't want to control Daisy, so he ardently spends his life trying to attain her instead of possessing her. This is shown when he purposely buys a large estate right in front of Daisy's mansion, and he is able to see Daisy right across from the bay. Jordan Baker informs Nick about her mysterious conversation with Gatsby, and Gatsby's love for Daisy Buchanan. Nick is astonished by Gatsby's unwavering attempts at meeting Daisy and he says, "The modesty of the demand shook me. He had waited five years and bought a mansion where he dispensed starlight to casual moths so that he could 'come over' some afternoon to a stranger's garden" (83). With having Jordan suggest such a plan to have Daisy over, Nick sees that Gatsby's love represents the American Dream itself. Gatsby's irresistible longing to pursue Daisy, and his belief that hopefully one day he will attain her is linked to his boundless optimism with which he goes about achieving his dream. It is clear that Gatsby chose to buy his house so he could see Daisy's house across the bay. Gatsby decides to win Daisy back, and his first step is to buy a house in West Egg. His house is across the bay from Daisy's house, and he can see a green light at the end of Daisy's dock which represents his hope that one day Daisy will become his. This proves that everything Gatsby does is to win back Daisy's love. He has thrown grandiose parties for five years in the hope that Daisy will show up to at least one of them. This shows that Gatsby is truly head over heels in love with Daisy, and he never ceases in his attempts to pursue her. Another example of Gatsby's impressive love for Daisy is when Nick is talking to Mr. Wolfshiem at the Forty-second Street cellar, and Mr. Wolfshiem informs Nick about Gatsby's pure intentions. Mr. Wolfshiem acknowledges, "Yeah, Gatsby's very careful about women. He would never so much as look at a friend's wife" (77). This shows that Gatsby's dream of finding his true love, Daisy, and getting married to her, keeps him from having affairs with other women. Without Gatsby even knowing it, through his ways of staying away from other women and only looking for one certain one, he made himself a truly obsessed romantic who is crazy over one girl, Daisy. He is hopelessly and madly in love with Daisy, and he could never even think about looking at any other girl. Gatsby's life revolves around Daisy, and everything he does is in an attempt to pursue Daisy. Gatsby spends his life passionately trying to prove his worth to Daisy instead of possessing her or dominating her.
             
              Some say that Jay Gatsby is a creepy stalker because he pursued Daisy Buchanan stealthily. However, this is inaccurate because Daisy Buchanan was aware of Gatsby's impassionate love for her and mutual feelings were present between the two. This is proven when Gatsby invites Nick and Daisy over to his house, where he shows them his possessions. Daisy is overwhelmed by Gatsby's luxurious lifestyle, and she starts to shed tears of joy and Gatsby glows, "Suddenly, with a strained sound, Daisy bent her head into the shirts and began to cry stormily. They're such beautiful shirts," she sobbed, her voice muffled in the thick folds. It makes me sad because I've never seen such- such beautiful shirts before" (98). This shows how Daisy is so in love with Gatsby, and she can't even handle being near his shirts. This also proves that Gatsby is not a stalker because his feelings are reciprocated by Daisy and mutually exclusive. Daisy is pleased with Gatsby's attention and sees their affair as somewhat special and poignant. For this reason, both Gatsby and Daisy have feelings for one another, and Gatsby's attention towards Daisy is not stalker like. In addition, another example that shows Gatsby is not a stalker is when Daisy starts complaining of her boredom, and she asks Gatsby if he wants to go into the city. In response, "Gatsby's eyes floated toward her. Their eyes met, and they stared together at each other, alone in space. With an effort she glanced down at the table. You always look so cool. She had told him that she loved him and Tom Buchanan saw" (125). This shows how Daisy confesses her love in a bizarre and allusive way. She sees Gatsby as a potential lover and still has feelings for him. For this reason, Gatsby is not a stalker because Daisy is pleased with Gatsby and has feelings for him. In this case, both Gatsby and Daisy love one another, but the circumstances of the times are keeping them apart. Gatsby is not a creepy stalker due to the fact that both Daisy and Gatsby have had a memorable past that Gatsby just wants to relive and bring back to life.
             
              Jay Gatsby is purely a devoted romantic; not a stalker, he adores Daisy Buchanan in hopes of a reciprocated love, and Gatsby doesn't want to control Daisy, so he avidly spends his life trying to gain her instead of possessing her. Jay Gatsby truly loves Daisy for the excitement that she provides him with and Gatsby plans his future with Daisy. Gatsby spends his life proving his worth to Daisy instead of attempting to subordinate her. Jay Gatsby's quixotic passion for Daisy Buchanan remains unwavering in hopes of a reciprocation of love which all comes to an end with Gatsby's murder. How far would you go to keep the hopes of love alive? What would one value more, unconditional love or conditional love?
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