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Terrorism has often been regarded by most Americans as an international problem. Once the 9/11 attacks were carried out in New York, Washington D.C., and in the skies over Pennsylvania, it quickly became a domestic problem. Many believe these horrific acts could have been prevented with more persistent domestic security as well as strong preventative measures. If our country would have had a federal agency dedicated solely to the objectives, things may have turned out different. Once everyone came to the realization that we, as a country, needed to do more the U.S. government enacted the P.A.T.R.I.O.T Act, or the Provide Appropriate Tools Required to Intercept and Obstruct Terrorism Act. Realizing one single act would not be enough to counteract and prevent further attacks, the Department of Homeland Security was created. First of all, the Patriot Act was set to, in the words of former President George W. Bush, "...enhance the penalties that will fall on terrorists or anyone who helps them." It was also intended to allow and further enhance law enforcement investigatory tools and tactics, allowing them to do more to pinpoint and prevent terrorism throughout the country. Then, the problem arises. This act was to protect U.S. citizens, not to harm them, although many claim this is too harsh and privacy invasive. Putting up all the necessary steps to prevent terrorist attacks requires certain privileges, and to be safe, these measures desperately need to be taken. In a poll taken shortly after the Act was put into play, 58% of United States citizens said the Patriot Act was a necessary action in preserving freedom and safety, while 31% said it gave the government too much power. Wake up, America, freedom doesn't come free. Next comes the 2003 creation of DHS, the Department of Homeland Security. After the attacks on 9/11, many Americans claimed that the CIA (Central Intelligence Agency) and the FBI (Federal Bureau of Investigations) were partially at fault for the tragedy and lost lives, because of allegedly not doing their job of keeping the terrorists from taking over the airplanes, let alone getting into the country. The U.S Government listened to these accusations, and as a result, DHS was founded, solely on preventing acts of terror and illegal violence throughout the U.S. The government listened to the cries of its people, set forth what they called for, and Americans complain about this solution. Many claim the desperate measures these officers have to take to do their job-keeping U.S citizens safe- are "infringing on basic rights". Many feel insecure about these branches having the ability to track and obtain personal information such as phone calls, text messages, pictures and videos. But these Americans want to be safe and secure. They don't want terrorism. How is law enforcement going to find terrorists and criminals' personal records and plots without monitoring their daily and constantly utilized devices? Where is the problem with these abilities? If someone is a posed threat to national security, wouldn't you want them caught as soon as possible? This shouldn't be a problem for any citizen unless, that is, you have something to hide. As detailed above, there really is no final solution to keeping the country safe and secure without the probability of unhappy citizens. The CIA, DHS, and FBI do everything in their power to protect its citizens as they ask, and will take the essential measures needed to prevent terrorist attacks and other violent and dangerous circumstances. If they are to be put to a task, there shouldn't be overwhelming restrictions as to how they accomplish it. We will finish what we started.
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Preventing terrorism essay
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Preventing Terrorism Essay

Words: 615    Pages: 2    Paragraphs: 4    Sentences: 49    Read Time: 02:14
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              Terrorism has often been regarded by most Americans as an international problem. Once the 9/11 attacks were carried out in New York, Washington D. C. , and in the skies over Pennsylvania, it quickly became a domestic problem. Many believe these horrific acts could have been prevented with more persistent domestic security as well as strong preventative measures. If our country would have had a federal agency dedicated solely to the objectives, things may have turned out different. Once everyone came to the realization that we, as a country, needed to do more the U. S. government enacted the P. A. T. R. I. O. T Act, or the Provide Appropriate Tools Required to Intercept and Obstruct Terrorism Act. Realizing one single act would not be enough to counteract and prevent further attacks, the Department of Homeland Security was created.
             
             
              First of all, the Patriot Act was set to, in the words of former President George W. Bush, ". . . enhance the penalties that will fall on terrorists or anyone who helps them. " It was also intended to allow and further enhance law enforcement investigatory tools and tactics, allowing them to do more to pinpoint and prevent terrorism throughout the country. Then, the problem arises. This act was to protect U. S. citizens, not to harm them, although many claim this is too harsh and privacy invasive. Putting up all the necessary steps to prevent terrorist attacks requires certain privileges, and to be safe, these measures desperately need to be taken. In a poll taken shortly after the Act was put into play, 58% of United States citizens said the Patriot Act was a necessary action in preserving freedom and safety, while 31% said it gave the government too much power. Wake up, America, freedom doesn't come free.
             
              Next comes the 2003 creation of DHS, the Department of Homeland Security. After the attacks on 9/11, many Americans claimed that the CIA (Central Intelligence Agency) and the FBI (Federal Bureau of Investigations) were partially at fault for the tragedy and lost lives, because of allegedly not doing their job of keeping the terrorists from taking over the airplanes, let alone getting into the country. The U. S Government listened to these accusations, and as a result, DHS was founded, solely on preventing acts of terror and illegal violence throughout the U. S. The government listened to the cries of its people, set forth what they called for, and Americans complain about this solution. Many claim the desperate measures these officers have to take to do their job-keeping U. S citizens safe- are "infringing on basic rights". Many feel insecure about these branches having the ability to track and obtain personal information such as phone calls, text messages, pictures and videos. But these Americans want to be safe and secure. They don't want terrorism. How is law enforcement going to find terrorists and criminals' personal records and plots without monitoring their daily and constantly utilized devices? Where is the problem with these abilities? If someone is a posed threat to national security, wouldn't you want them caught as soon as possible? This shouldn't be a problem for any citizen unless, that is, you have something to hide.
             
              As detailed above, there really is no final solution to keeping the country safe and secure without the probability of unhappy citizens. The CIA, DHS, and FBI do everything in their power to protect its citizens as they ask, and will take the essential measures needed to prevent terrorist attacks and other violent and dangerous circumstances. If they are to be put to a task, there shouldn't be overwhelming restrictions as to how they accomplish it. We will finish what we started.
Terrorism Essay 
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