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Who should be responsible for stopping the 120 million sperm that are released during a male orgasm from fertilizing a female's egg? The context of that question has been a societal debate in terms of the consequences of unplanned pregnancy and whether it is a female, male or both sexes responsibility to practice "safe sex". Introducing the birth control pill for women in the 1960s created a huge controversy between sexual conservatives and the women who would benefit from the pill, but the responsibility still remained in the hands of women. However, as medicine has advanced and the possibility of a male birth control pill has amounted, many wonder if the same issues would arise if a male birth control pill did in fact become available. In order to understand the effects on society of both individual female and male responsibilities it is essential that the women birth control pill is discussed, the male pill and lastly, what the stigmas and potential effects of both birth control pills mean. The female birth control pill became available to the public in 1961. During that time period the acceptance of women sexuality was becoming more common; however, critics felt that the pill promoted unnecessary female sexual behavior. The fact that a woman could partake in casual sex without worrying about becoming pregnant was an issue amongst many people in society. Although premarital sex was not completely shunned as it was a couple decades previous to that time, many still felt as if a woman should not enjoy multiple sexual relationships. Women were expected to only act or feel sexually toward one man who she was in a serious relationship with. With that being said, the grounds for accepting the use of female contraceptives became a blurred line between what many felt was the "green light" for women to have a sex life and what could potentially harm societies view of the American woman. Whether or not society approved or disapproved birth control for women, it was clear that the responsibility of the possible negative effects of having sex was left up to the woman. Many would agree that that statement still applies today as well. Furthermore, it is understandable that women are seen as more driven or "trustworthy" to protect themselves, because they are responsible for carrying and becoming a mother to a child if impregnated. That idea, however feeds the double standard that men can be very sexually active without worrying about the life altering effects they are causing women. So, if it is socially acceptable for men to sleep around and not women then shouldn't they be responsible for preventing unplanned pregnancies? Amongst other things, that question has led medical researchers to attempt to create a male birth control pill. An equal share in responsibility of men and women during sex would be the ultimate goal. It has been made clear that in the 1960s and even today that society accepts the fact that men have a sex drive and they act on it quite frequently. Currently, the measures that men can go to in order to prevent impregnation during sex are condoms or a vasectomy. Condoms as many know are not a reliable source of protection as they commonly break. Then, a vasectomy for one is a surgical procedure that takes extreme measures to reverse. Men often feel as if they are emasculated by the procedure as well, so the option of male birth control should be the best option. The trials for male contraceptives that have been tested however have raised some issues pertaining to the hormone levels of men and how their bodies react to the pill. Which, when you consider the many health concerns females have to endure from taking birth control it shouldn't matter. The double standard that exists comes into play when comparing these issues. If male birth control became an option, conservatives in society most likely wouldn't disapprove of it as some still do for female contraceptives. Like mentioned before, men are basically expected to sleep around, so if there was a way they could do it without the risk of creating a baby then it would be supported. Male birth control could be a huge benefit in society, but even if it was approved and supported by pharmaceuticals the chances of consistent use with in the male community could become an issue. In the 2000's it was recorded that around 55% of men claim that they would try/take a birth control pill. This number leaves the remaining 45% left with no "real" responsibility of creating equal protection during sex. It also leaves women to wonder if their man is in fact taking the pill correctly. Therefore, a male birth control pill could create more trust issues mainly based off the already made stereotypes and expectations of men in sexual relationships. The idea of a male birth control pill might seem very appealing to a woman, so that she doesn't have to contribute all of the effect for prevention. However, the reality of making the pill truly effective is that it is going to have to first be recommended or approved by society and cause no effects to a man's sex drive as well as his future desires for children. The current research that is being conducted however has made a gel that would be used as a onetime injection that prevents sperm from being ejaculated. This gel that would be injected could easily be reversed by a counter-injection. With the possibility of such birth control option going on the market, it has potential to change how sexual relationship's work today. Since it is also a one-time procedure, it would most likely reduce the issues women have about the trustworthiness of their man taking a pill. This option seems as if it is the biggest step toward equal responsibility between men and women during sex. Furthermore, birth control has made a huge impact on society. Whether people view it as negative or positive it has allowed for change and sexual responsibility. Therefore, if eventually both male and female have the option to take or be injected with a form of birth control then who knows that revolutions that could bring forth.
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An essay on Male Birth Control
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An Essay On Male Birth Control

Words: 1042    Pages: 4    Paragraphs: 7    Sentences: 44    Read Time: 03:47
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              Who should be responsible for stopping the 120 million sperm that are released during a male orgasm from fertilizing a female's egg? The context of that question has been a societal debate in terms of the consequences of unplanned pregnancy and whether it is a female, male or both sexes responsibility to practice "safe sex". Introducing the birth control pill for women in the 1960s created a huge controversy between sexual conservatives and the women who would benefit from the pill, but the responsibility still remained in the hands of women. However, as medicine has advanced and the possibility of a male birth control pill has amounted, many wonder if the same issues would arise if a male birth control pill did in fact become available. In order to understand the effects on society of both individual female and male responsibilities it is essential that the women birth control pill is discussed, the male pill and lastly, what the stigmas and potential effects of both birth control pills mean.
             
              The female birth control pill became available to the public in 1961. During that time period the acceptance of women sexuality was becoming more common; however, critics felt that the pill promoted unnecessary female sexual behavior. The fact that a woman could partake in casual sex without worrying about becoming pregnant was an issue amongst many people in society. Although premarital sex was not completely shunned as it was a couple decades previous to that time, many still felt as if a woman should not enjoy multiple sexual relationships. Women were expected to only act or feel sexually toward one man who she was in a serious relationship with. With that being said, the grounds for accepting the use of female contraceptives became a blurred line between what many felt was the "green light" for women to have a sex life and what could potentially harm societies view of the American woman.
             
              Whether or not society approved or disapproved birth control for women, it was clear that the responsibility of the possible negative effects of having sex was left up to the woman. Many would agree that that statement still applies today as well. Furthermore, it is understandable that women are seen as more driven or "trustworthy" to protect themselves, because they are responsible for carrying and becoming a mother to a child if impregnated. That idea, however feeds the double standard that men can be very sexually active without worrying about the life altering effects they are causing women. So, if it is socially acceptable for men to sleep around and not women then shouldn't they be responsible for preventing unplanned pregnancies?
             
              Amongst other things, that question has led medical researchers to attempt to create a male birth control pill. An equal share in responsibility of men and women during sex would be the ultimate goal. It has been made clear that in the 1960s and even today that society accepts the fact that men have a sex drive and they act on it quite frequently. Currently, the measures that men can go to in order to prevent impregnation during sex are condoms or a vasectomy. Condoms as many know are not a reliable source of protection as they commonly break. Then, a vasectomy for one is a surgical procedure that takes extreme measures to reverse. Men often feel as if they are emasculated by the procedure as well, so the option of male birth control should be the best option. The trials for male contraceptives that have been tested however have raised some issues pertaining to the hormone levels of men and how their bodies react to the pill. Which, when you consider the many health concerns females have to endure from taking birth control it shouldn't matter. The double standard that exists comes into play when comparing these issues.
             
              If male birth control became an option, conservatives in society most likely wouldn't disapprove of it as some still do for female contraceptives. Like mentioned before, men are basically expected to sleep around, so if there was a way they could do it without the risk of creating a baby then it would be supported. Male birth control could be a huge benefit in society, but even if it was approved and supported by pharmaceuticals the chances of consistent use with in the male community could become an issue. In the 2000's it was recorded that around 55% of men claim that they would try/take a birth control pill. This number leaves the remaining 45% left with no "real" responsibility of creating equal protection during sex. It also leaves women to wonder if their man is in fact taking the pill correctly. Therefore, a male birth control pill could create more trust issues mainly based off the already made stereotypes and expectations of men in sexual relationships.
              The idea of a male birth control pill might seem very appealing to a woman, so that she doesn't have to contribute all of the effect for prevention. However, the reality of making the pill truly effective is that it is going to have to first be recommended or approved by society and cause no effects to a man's sex drive as well as his future desires for children. The current research that is being conducted however has made a gel that would be used as a onetime injection that prevents sperm from being ejaculated. This gel that would be injected could easily be reversed by a counter-injection. With the possibility of such birth control option going on the market, it has potential to change how sexual relationship's work today. Since it is also a one-time procedure, it would most likely reduce the issues women have about the trustworthiness of their man taking a pill. This option seems as if it is the biggest step toward equal responsibility between men and women during sex.
             
              Furthermore, birth control has made a huge impact on society. Whether people view it as negative or positive it has allowed for change and sexual responsibility. Therefore, if eventually both male and female have the option to take or be injected with a form of birth control then who knows that revolutions that could bring forth.
Birth Control Essay 
Watson, Stephanie, and Cristen Conger. "How the Male Birth Control Pill Will Work." How Stuff Works. N.p., 09 Jul 2005 . Web. 13 Apr 2014. .
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